Anna Sew Hoybroken arm06/09/2003–
11/10/2003

Koichi grabs his cat, and holding its head, straps his casio watch around its neck. A rock comes alive from the sludge at the bottom of the East River, and wraps around a kiddie bike, crushing it. Or you run a red light, swerve to avoid a Saab on your left, and slam into a boulder that takes over your body. In the street, dirt piles and old bricks look just like sculpture, or a good place to ride your bike. Staring at the clouds, staring into the coffee table, caught seeing things you wont mention. Did it really happen? Technology is part of nature because technology comes from people, and people are part of nature. Ikebana is an art form where the arrangement is a living thing in which nature and humanity are brought together. A rock is a weight, a momentum when it is hurtling thru space, a beautiful form, a weapon. Momentum, gravity, air, memory, shivering, dissolving. A handful of sand is thrown into the sky, touches the sun, and becomes glass. Distrust the attractive, but also desire it. In Brooklyn pieces of scaffold wash up radioactive off the East River next to the Mack trucks abandoned there. Overturned mattresses, dead trees, thick hemp rope, cables, broken cement. Building up and smashing down.
For her first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, ANNA SEW HOY(b. New Zealand, 1976, lives/works in Los Angeles) will present an installation of delicate and forceful sculptures based on principles of Ikebana (the Japanese art of flower arrangement). As with Ikebana, her works are composed of accumulations of the wonderful elements of everyday life, arranged with an eye for balancing one moment in time where all the elements of her sculptures come together to create “beauty”. Of course, there is always the danger that her sculptures will come apart, as with a flower arrangement dying, but that increases the beauty of the moment in which her sculptures exist. Previous solo and group exhibitions include Massimo Audiello Gallery (1999, 2001, 2002), Daniel Reich Gallery (2002), and Team Gallery (2001).